Nurse Teaching for Diabetes

A diabetic nurse should educate the patient on self-insulin injection and how to perform fingerstick tests for blood glucose level

Nurse Teaching for Diabetes

Nurse Teaching for Diabetes

A diabetic nurse should educate the patient on self-insulin injection and how to perform fingerstick tests for blood glucose level monitoring.

What should a nurse teach for debate patients?

Nurses should assess the patient's knowledge related to diabetes care and provide education regarding dietary intake (such as limiting carbohydrate intake), exercise, and medications since these factors influence blood glucose levels.

What is diabetic nursing education?

Endocrine and Diabetes nursing focuses on preventing and treating conditions related to the organs and glands that produce hormones. The endocrine organs and glands include the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal glands, pineal body, ovaries, testes, and pancreas.

How do you educate diabetic patients?

  • Use fat-free or low-fat milk and yogurt.
  • Eat as little added sugar as possible each day.
  • Use less fat and oil when cooking and baking.
  • Eat unprocessed, high-fiber foods like whole grains, fruits and veggies.
  • Bake, broil or grill lean meats.

What is the ABC of Diabetes?

How  to Help You Stay Healthy With Diabetes
Know your diabetes ABCs. Talk to your healthcare team about managing your ABC numbers—A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol—and quitting smoking. These actions can help lower your chance of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes problems.

What are the 4 Ps of Diabetes?

Symptoms and Management of the 4 Ps of Diabetes: Polyuria
People with Diabetes often experience one or more of the 4 Ps associated with the condition: polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia and polyneuropathy, usually resulting from high blood glucose levels. Proper management is crucial to avoid potential complications arising from these symptoms.

SN explained that Diabetes can affect the small blood vessels of the body that supply the skin with blood. Changes to the blood vessels because of Diabetes can cause a skin condition called diabetic dermopathy. This appears as scaly patches that are light brown or red, often on the front of the legs.

Diabetes Teaching 2017

SN instructed the patient on diabetes and kidney problems and that diabetes mellitus ( DM ) is one of the leading causes of kidney failure in the United States. Approximately one-half of people who need dialysis have kidney disease from Diabetes.

With that, tight blood sugar control must be achieved by avoiding concentrated sweets and high-carbohydrate-content foods. Diabetic patients with hypertension have a particular lower blood pressure target of less than 130 / 80 mmHg to reduce cardiovascular risk and delay the progression of kidney disease.

Diabetes Teaching 1600

SN completed an assessment of all body systems and checked vital signs, blood sugar monitoring, hydration, nutrition intake, and medication compliance. SN refilled the patient's medication box for daily routine. Taught the patient to carefully manage her blood sugar with diet, physical activity, and medication to prevent diabetes complications and avoid hypo/hyperglycemia.

Nursing Management

  • Monitor blood sugar and use a sliding scale to treat high glucose levels.
  • Educate patient about Diabetes
  • Examine feet and skin and teach patient foot care
  • Educate the patient on foot protection
  • Monitor vitals
  • Teach the patient about insulin self-injections and how to perform fingersticks.
  • Encourage annual visits to the dentist, ophthalmologist, cardiologist, and neurologist.
  • Teach the patient about hypoglycemia and how to manage it
  • Teach the patient about nutrition and the importance of exercise
  • Urge the patient not to smoke and to abstain from alcohol

Outcome Identification

Type 1 DM is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Close to 50% of patients will develop a severe complication over their lifetime. Some will lose eyesight, and others will develop end-stage renal disease.

The prognosis suits those who make it past the first 20 years. However, the disease has no cure, and with time, the patient may develop premature coronary artery disease, neuropathy, foot ulcers, and vision loss.

Maintaining euglycemia for a lifetime is associated with severe anxiety and depression; for many patients with type 1 diabetes, the quality of life is poor.

Coordination of Care

Type 1 diabetes is a systemic disorder with diverse presentations and very high morbidity; for this reason, the condition is best managed by an interprofessional team of healthcare professionals.

Type 1 diabetes is a severe disorder with very high morbidity and mortality. Over the long term, the vast majority of patients with this disorder will develop blindness, adverse cardiac events, end-stage renal disease, neuropathy, and, in some cases, premature death. Data indicate that those patients who manage to control their blood sugars without developing severe complications tend to have a good quality of life.

The patient must be screened for foot, eye, and eye complications at each visit. Appropriate referrals need to be made before disease occurs in these organs. A diabetic nurse should educate the patient on self-insulin injection and how to perform fingerstick tests for blood glucose level monitoring.

Social workers should be involved in the care to ensure that the patient has adequate support and finances for treatment. Communication with the interprofessional team should be prompt to ensure no patient is denied treatment. With assurance and guidance, many patients with type 1 diabetes can live a good quality of life.

Health Teaching and Health Promotion

As stated above, patient compliance with their medications, follow-up with specialists, and patient education is critical in preventing complications. At every patient encounter, the pharmacist, nurse, and clinicians should emphasize the importance of blood glucose control, long-term complications, and management goals.

The patient should be encouraged to modify their lifestyle to reduce the risk of complications. In addition, all people with Diabetes should be made aware of the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia and ways of managing it.

Patients should be educated about available resources and the benefits of joining support groups. A dietitian should educate the patient about foods that can be consumed, and the nurse should educate the patient on blood glucose monitoring at home.

  • Fever
  • Unstable hemodynamics
  • No urine output
  • Acute vision loss
  • Chest pain
  • Confused
  • Low or high blood sugars
  • The presence of ketones in the urine
  • Altered mental status

Discharge Planning

Patient medication compliance and follow-up with specialists and educators are critical factors in preventing complications. Patients need to understand their disease, how to monitor glucose, and importance of medication compliance. At each follow-up visit, the patient must be screened for foot, eye, and eye complications.

Appropriate referrals need to be made before disease occurs in these organs. A home care diabetic nurse should educate the patient on self-insulin injection and how to perform fingerstick tests for blood glucose level monitoring.

Pearls and Other issues

Type 1 diabetes is a systemic disorder with diverse presentations and very high morbidity; for this reason, the condition is best managed by an interprofessional team of healthcare professionals.

Type 1 diabetes is a severe disorder with very high morbidity and mortality. Over the long term, the vast majority of patients with this disorder will develop blindness, adverse cardiac events, end-stage renal disease, neuropathy, and, in some cases, premature death. Data indicate that those patients who manage to control their blood sugars without developing severe complications tend to have a good quality of life.